Salix myricoides myricoides

Salix myricoides var. myricoides

Common Names

Blueleaf Willow (English), Blue-leaf Willow (English), Bayberry Willow (English)

Languages: English

Conservation

Conservation Status

The related entity below is listed by the U.S. federal government or a state. Common names are from state and federal lists. In Maine Salix myricoides,
blue-leaf willow is listed as Endangered. (USDA PLANTS, 2009)

Author(s): Beck, Nicholas
Rights holder(s): Beck, Nicholas

Description

Morphology

Overall this is a shrub/tree. (NPIN, 2007) This is a low, spreading, bushy shrub.(Peattie, 1930)

Flowers Bloom color can be yellow or purple. (NPIN, 2007) Flowers appear before the leaves. Catkins are long and slender. Scales are brown or black and pubescent with long gray twisted hairs. There are 2 stamens. The style is short and twice as long as the thick stigmas. The sexes are on different plants. Male flowers are accompanied by 1 or 2 small glands. Female flowers have a small flat gland near the base of the ovary. (Peattie, 1930)

Fruit The capsule is conic-subulate and glabrous.(Peattie, 1930)

Leaves are glabrous (hairless), dark green, and egg-shaped. They have a glaucous (bluish white or whitened) coating and a densely hairy stem, especially when young. (Weatherbee, 2006) Stipules are half-heart-shaped or kidney-shaped. Mature leaves are glabrous beneath. The base may be rounded or cordate, the tip acute to short-acuminate. They are dark green above, glaucous beneath, and elliptical-lanceolate or obovate. Leaves blacken in drying. The margins are serrate or crenate-serrate. Old leaves become veiny. Young leaves are much unlike the mature ones. (Peattie, 1930)

Stems are densely hairy, especially when young. (Weatherbee, 2006) Twigs are stout, yellowish to brown, downy at first, and then glabrate. Twigs are round and limber. (Peattie, 1930)

Author(s): Beck, Nicholas
Rights holder(s): Beck, Nicholas

Size

Plant is generally less than 3m tall. (Peattie, 1930)

Leaves are 4-12 cm (1.5-4.75") long x 1-6 cm (3/8-2.5") wide. (Weatherbee, 2006)

Author(s): Beck, Nicholas
Rights holder(s): Beck, Nicholas

Look Alikes

Salix interior (Sandbar Willow) and Salix cordata (Sand Dune Willow) are likely to be encountered on beaches as well. (Weatherbee, 2006) The willows can be a very difficult group to identify. (Peattie, 1930)

Author(s): Beck, Nicholas
Rights holder(s): Beck, Nicholas

Ecology and Distribution

Distribution

USA: IL , IN , ME , MI , MN , NH , OH , PA , WI (NPIN, 2007)

Canada: NB , NL , ON , PE , QC (NPIN, 2007)

USDA Native Status: L48(N), CAN(N) (NPIN, 2007)

Author(s): Beck, Nicholas
Rights holder(s): Beck, Nicholas

Habitat

This plant is rarely found inland. (Weatherbee, 2006) Habitat includes wooded dunes and along the shore of Lake Michigan in the US. (Peattie, 1930)

Author(s): Beck, Nicholas
Rights holder(s): Beck, Nicholas

Life Expectancy

This is a perennial. (NPIN, 2007)

Author(s): Beck, Nicholas
Rights holder(s): Beck, Nicholas

Ecology

Willows rely on wind to spread pollen from the male to the female flowers. When the shrubs are in full flower, it is easy to spot the difference between the male and female plants. After the pollen has been shed, the male pollen structures wither and fall off, and the female ovaries plump up with ripening seeds. The dense hairs on the leaves protect the plant from dessication due to the wind and the challenges of extreme temperatures. All willows have one scale per bud and are dioecious (sexes on separate plants). (Weatherbee, 2006)

Author(s): Beck, Nicholas
Rights holder(s): Beck, Nicholas

References

Kartesz, J. T., & Biota_of_North_America_Program (2009).   USDA PLANTS Profile: Salix myricoides Muhl. var. myricoides, Bayberry willow.
Peattie, D C. (1930).  Flora of the Indiana dunes, a handbook of the flowering plants and ferns of the lake Michigan Coast of Indiana and of the Calumet District. 432 . Chicago: Field Museum of Natural History.
Staff, TWC. (2007).  NPIN: Salix myricoides var. myricoides (Bayberry willow).
Weatherbee, E E. (2006).  Guide to Great Lakes Coastal Plants. 180. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press.